DomainTools.com Rolls Out Redesigned Site

A reader noticed that DomainTools.com has undergone a pretty dramatic designed home page today.

The home page has a much more modern look and feel.

Interestedly DomainTools.com which seemed to start out as a product geared towards the domainer community is now highlighting the usefulness of the site as a tool for Law Enforcement and Brand Protection Companies.

According to Tim Chen of DomainTools.com, the general context of site resign is really the the homepage which was meant to:
-starting to focus on our buying segments, rather than being what many people think of as a ‘collection of tools for domainers’

-to specifically add content for the enterprise buyers, who have been a fast-growing segment for us.   These are folks that need more than an individual membership (bulk data, custom parsing, group memberships, APIs, etc)

“It’s important to note that our domaining customers remain very important.  ”

“For them though, the DT homepage is not necessarily terribly relevant. ”

“We have a follow-on project to redesign this page:  whois.domaintools.com to better service our important domaining clientele.  ”

Here are some pretty impressive numbers of DomainTools.com records that are on the front page of the site now:

BY THE NUMBERS

3.8 BILLION  IP address change events
7.1 BILLION  whois records
2.5 BILLION  name server change events
1.4 BILLION  registrar change events

 

domaintools

Comments

  1. says

    The expanding submenus are annoying. They should have put the menus at the very top, like Google does, for example. And if the menus are going to expand, they should just be regular drop-down menus, not menus that push all the rest of the content down the page by hundreds of pixels.

  2. says

    I agree with George.

    Design is fine but they have to stop that annoying drop down on the whois page.

    Every time I visit a whois page the content shifts down because I moused over the products or solutions tab.

  3. bnalponstog says

    Barn M
    You’re right about the creep factor. It kind of insinuates that every domain registrant is a potential criminal. Which is a giant F.U. to those many who have in large part helped grow their business.

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