Google Reports: Revenue Up 31%; Paid Clicks Up 20%; Cost Per Click Down 4%

Google Inc. its earnings after the market closed today, reporting a first-quarter profit of $3.35 billion, or $9.94 a share, compared with a profit of $2.89 billion, or $8.75 a share, for the year-earlier period.

Shares of Google are up just marginally after the report.

Google ends the 1st quarter with over $50 Billion in the bank.

Here are the details:

Google Inc. reported consolidated revenues of $13.97 billion for the quarter ended March 31, 2013, an increase of 31% compared to the first quarter of 2012.

            Google Revenues (advertising and other) – Google revenues were $12.95 billion, or 93% of consolidated  revenues, in the first quarter of 2013, representing a 22% increase over first quarter 2012 revenues of $10.65 billion.

  • Google Sites Revenues – Google-owned sites generated revenues of $8.64 billion, or 67% of total Google revenues, in the first quarter of 2013. This represents an 18% increase over first quarter 2012 Google sites revenues of $7.31 billion.
  • Google Network Revenues – Google’s partner sites generated revenues of $3.26 billion, or 25% of total Google revenues, in the first quarter of 2013. This represents a 12% increase from first quarter 2012 Google network revenues of $2.91 billion.
  • Other Revenues – Other revenues from Google were $1.05 billion, or 8% of total Google revenues, in the first quarter of 2013.  This represents a 150% increase over first quarter 2012 other revenues of $420 million.

Paid Clicks – Aggregate paid clicks, which include clicks related to ads served on Google sites and the sites of our Network members, increased approximately 20% over the first quarter of 2012 and increased approximately 3% over the fourth quarter of 2012Cost-Per-Click – Average cost-per-click, which includes clicks related to ads served on Google sites and the sites of our Network members, decreased approximately 4% over the first quarter of 2012 and decreased approximately 4% over the fourth quarter of 2012.

TAC – Traffic acquisition costs, the portion of revenues shared with Google’s partners, increased to $2.96 billion in the first quarter of 2013, compared to $2.51 billion in the first quarter of 2012. TAC as a percentage of advertising revenues was 25% in the first quarter of 2013, compared to 25% in the first quarter of 2012.

The majority of TAC is related to amounts ultimately paid to our Network members, which totaled $2.28 billion in the first quarter of 2013. TAC also includes amounts ultimately paid to certain distribution partners and others who direct traffic to our website, which totaled $680 million in the first quarter of 2013.

Income Taxes – Our effective tax rate was 8% for the first quarter of 2013.

Net Income – GAAP net income in the first quarter of 2013 was $3.35 billion, compared to $2.89 billion in the first quarter of 2012. Non-GAAP net income was $3.90 billion in the first quarter of 2013, compared to $3.33 billion in the first quarter of 2012. GAAP EPS in the first quarter of 2013 was $9.94 on 337 million diluted shares outstanding, compared to $8.75 in the first quarter of 2012 on 330 million diluted shares outstanding. Non-GAAP EPS in the first quarter of 2013 was $11.58, compared to $10.08 in the first quarter of 2012.

Cash – As of March 31, 2013, cash, cash equivalents, and marketable securities were $50.1 billion.

Headcount – On a worldwide basis, we employed 53,891 full-time employees (38,739 in Google and 9,982 in Motorola Mobile and 5,170 in Motorola Home) as of March 31, 2013, compared to 53,861 full-time employees as of December 31, 2012.

 

Comments

  1. says

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    Google is in the process of moving off .com ”
    ________________________________

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  2. says

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  3. says

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    Gratefully, Jeff Schneider (Contact Group) (Metal Tiger)

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