New York Is Excited About The New gTLD’s & It’s Upcoming .NYC Extension

The city of New York put out a press release on the new gTLD’s and clearly are excited about the prospects of their soon being a .NYC

 

“”Today, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers ( ICANN ) announced it will dramatically expand its domain offerings and will begin accepting applications for new domains in January 2012.  Once approved, this will allow for the addition of a dot New York City suffix that will be operated by a private vendor and be made available to New York City businesses and residents.”

“This is a fantastic opportunity for the New York City establishments that will now be able to secure their online presence with a top-level domain name, and for the City of New York, which will benefit from the millions of dollars in revenue dot NYC will generate.”

“When I first proposed launching a New York City specific domain in my State of the City two years ago, it was because I saw the enormous potential for New York City businesses to carve out a place of their own on the Internet.”

“With ICANN’s support, and the hard work of Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications Commissioner Carole Post, New York City Chief Digital Officer Rachel Sterne and former and present chairs of the Committee on Technology, Council Members Gale Brewer and Fernando Cabrera, today that potential has been realized.”

“I applaud ICANN’s decision to increase the availability of new domains, and in doing so, allow New York City businesses the freedom to take control of their Internet presence.”

“Dot NYC will reflect the locality that defines New York City and makes our vendors one of a kind. I look forward to working with the DoIT to find a suitable operator to help administer dot NYC.”

City Council Member Gale Brewer:

“Today’s decision by ICANN opens the doors for New York City, like many of our global competitors, to apply for a top-level domain name. I applaud the efforts of those advocating for a domain name to ensure that local small businesses and merchants based in New York City are able to brand themselves as such. The small business community is a vital part of the New York City economy and any opportunity to increase their exposure while facilitating easy searching online is a smart step forward.”

 

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Comments

  1. LS Morgan says

    I hope the geo TLDs go to the cities, are expensive to privately acquire and vetted for local presence/residency nexus.

    I don’t want a bunch of half retarded domain speculators shitting up .chicago because they have a godaddy account and access to a debit card.

    Let the mechanics in Chicago have a shot at mechanics.chicago.

  2. says

    ‘operated by a private vendor’ . . Hmm interesting, I thought that TLDs were supposed to be vended through any accredited registrar. Sounds to me like they have vertically integrated monopolistic ideas for the distribution of .NYC domains.

  3. MHB says

    TAG

    The city is going to want a company to operate the registry for them, the city isn’t going to hire city employees to operate the registry.

    domains will be sold through registrars.

  4. LS Morgan says

    That isn’t necessarily what that means.
    “Operated by a private vendor” may simply mean that the zone servers will be operated by a contracted vendor, while management of the TLD remains under control of the city leaders.

    Also, there is no rule that every registrar must sell any TLD.
    Personally, I hope the cities that operate their own TLD completely wall the garden- internalie every aspect of the entire affair and remove it as far away from the interests of speculative keyword hording as they possibly can.

    My hope is for a loophole-free residency nexus scheme. At least for .chicago.
    Other cities, I couldn’t care less what they do.

  5. says

    If these local geo gTLD don’t have some type of nexus requirements, and the top terms end up in the hands of domainers, these extensions will be DOA.

    If rolled out properly some of the better GEO extension could get some traction.

    Brad

  6. Gazzip says

    “If these local geo gTLD don’t have some type of nexus requirements, and the top terms end up in the hands of domainers, these extensions will be DOA.”

    Wonder who gets to own Realestate.NYC or Hotels.NYC ? The highest bidder or a company insider ?

    Hmmm, they look really good as an extension, even if it is backwards. ;)

    So this would mean there will be no .newyork allowed then ?

  7. Gazzip says

    “‘operated by a private vendor’ . . Hmm interesting, I thought that TLDs were supposed to be vended through any accredited registrar. Sounds to me like they have vertically integrated monopolistic ideas for the distribution of .NYC domains.”

    @Tag – From their website

    “Together they have launched five successful top-level domains, advised dozens of others and created the model for public-private partnerships for geographic-based web addresses. ……….”

    dotNYC CEO Antony Van Couvering has deep experience in the domain name field and was a creator of ICANN.

    He has started and run several businesses specializing in creating and operating domains, including NetNames USA and NameEngine, both of which were acquired by public companies.

    dotNYC founder William Semich is a founder of ICANN and helped design the initial processes and policies for creating new Top Level Domains in the 1990s.

    He remains active in .asia, which he helped found. He is a former senior staff member to the mayor of Boston and served as that city’s director of finance and deputy director of economic development.

    dotnyc.net/about/team/

    ———————————-

    Any idea what the other 4 successful top-level domains were MHB ?

    Assuming .Asia is one of them

  8. canadomain says

    Toronto may not be New York City, but it is a bustling metropolitan core with about 5.5 million ppl in the greater area. The most common nickname and abbreviation for Toronto is TO. The .to extension has been available for years, and yet it is largely ignored by Toronto businesses and individuals. Maybe part of it is a lack of marketing on .to’s behalf, but even still, I can’t help but feel the only true winner in the gTLD game will be ICANN. The vast majority of these extensions will fail miserably, and what will happen to customers when eventually some gTLDs go out of business?

  9. pt says

    This is why they will fail.

    So every person around the globe is going to remember that it is “.NYC” and not “.NewYork” or instead “.NewYorkCity” ??

    Too many different options for everything. Some will inevitable succeed, but remember them and knowing which are active will be too hard for thousands of them.

    It’s just not realistic. Fun to imagine, but not realistic.

  10. says

    @gazzip
    I understood that the city had not yet selected their registry partner. There were at least two separate parties vying.

    http://connectingnyc.org
    http://dotnyc.net

    Am I wrong? has New York City selected their registry services provider?

    @pt A registry’s definition of ‘fail’ is much different from a domainers, as MHB has pointed out

    http://www.thedomains.com/2011/03/15/right-of-the-dot-com-my-take-on-the-new-gtlds-the-next-25-years-how-you-can-profit/

  11. MHB says

    LS

    “”Also, there is no rule that every registrar must sell any TLD.””

    Correct

    Moreover new registrars maybe set up, maybe even NY based ones just to sell .nyc domains.

  12. MHB says

    My Amazing

    “”will non-NYC people be allowed to buy .nyc domains?””

    My guess is yes but the registry can if they want elect to restrict registrations to those having a NY address or presence

  13. Yawni says

    After much thought and numerous rounds of mental chess with my Mensan friends, here’s my take ot just on .NYC, but on all of the upcoming gTLDs…

    In 2014 (or later!), the new gTLD’s will be rolled out.

    They will be a huge failure — as were .Aero, .Travel, .Museum, .Jobs, .Mobi, .Biz and .Coop. Hey, did you know that the extension .CAT has been available since 2005? Who knew? Go ahead and Google it. I’ll wait. As such, can someone perhaps explain to me why it’s not popular with feline lovers? Knowing this, do you really believe that .DOG or .PET will do any better? Highly unlikely, my friends.

    I truly believe that those who are foolish enough to invest in gTLD’s will lose their cybershirts.

    As it becomes obvious that the gTLD concept is flawed, the laws of supply and demand will kick in and the value of a properly-spelled, generic .COM will absolutely need to skyrocket — even beyond what they are today. Mortgages on a premium piece of oceanfront domain will be common. Why would they not?

    Just as landlords now rent out commercial bays in shopping plazas, so too shall domainers rent out their precious domain names to entities who want to monetize the traffic and benefit from the .COM prestige and credibility — something the in cohesive gTLDs will always lack.

    There you have it, my predictions. Take ‘em or leave em, but it seems pretty obvious to me.

    Allow me to succinctly summarize everything for you: keep renewing those .COM’s. If you let them drop, you probably won’t be able to afford to buy them back in a few years

  14. canadomain says

    @Yawni
    I agree with you on that. The generic cream of the ‘traditional’ TLDs and ccTLDs will rise substantially as the marketplace gets more cluttered with more noise.

  15. aliquot says

    the mensans are playing mental chess with issues of domain names?

    if gtlds become reality, my guess is dotnyc will probably get the biggest marketing push of any non-corporate new gtld.

    and my guess is that it’s marketing that will decide the fate of any new gtld.

    the simple reason is because we don’t need any more gtld’s. how do you sell something that people don’t need? you know the answer.

    as far as i’ve seen the only people still asking for new gtld’s after the .travel’s and .coop’s etc. are people who are hoping to make money from this.
    (from what i’ve read there was demand for .cat in spain. and it’s been quite popular there with many registrations. but it might just be typical domain business spin.)

    if anyone knows where to find some evidence of user demand for new gtld’s please let us all know.

    icann was asked to perform studies on the market. they never delivered. is that a coincidence?

    maybe people won’t know they want a .nyc domain name until the marketers make them aware of it. never underestimate the power of effective marketing.

  16. aliquot says

    does the importance of marketing change depending on how much choice the customer has?

    when the customer is given more choice in selecting a product, choosing from a variety of comparable alternative choices, then does marketing become more important?

    please correct me if my memory is wrong, but in the early 90′s, .com was pretty much the only choice of a suitable tld unless you were a university (.edu), network operator (.net), non-profit organisation (.org) or in some other restricted class (.mil, .int, etc). net and org later opened up but only after com had become solidified as the “default tld” for individuals and businesses. in people’s minds www = dotcom. what followed in the late 90′s was not the “web” bubble (com/net/etc), but the “dotcom” bubble. www = dotcom.

    today a registrant is greeted with many choices about which tld to select. many registries are open to all with few restrictions. com still seems like a default choice but there is much more choice than there used to be.

    the arrival of new gtld’s is going to increase the number of choices. so my guess is tld’s now need their own marketing in a way that .com never did. in the 90′s, i could not distinguish between the marketing of the web itself and the marketing of any specific tld.

    as i remember it, the arrival and “marketing” of the web itself sold dotcom. the popularity of the web meant the popularity of dotcom.

    but is this the case with new gtlds? no, they need their own marketing campaigns to achieve the kind of growth and traction that the established registries like com/net/org acquired as the number of web grew.

  17. says

    but is this the case with new gtlds? no, they need their own marketing campaigns to achieve the kind of growth and traction that the established registries like com/net/org acquired as the number of web grew.

    The web is massive – Marketing a new gTLDs to other than a small niche of users you have access to from other sources will be prohibitively expensive.

  18. Gazzip says

    “I understood that the city had not yet selected their registry partner. There were at least two separate parties vying. ”

    “No NY hasn’t selected their registry services provider?

    Minds+Machines is in trying as well”

    ————————–

    I’m sorry guys, I thought minds and machines were the only ones after .NYC and it was just a matter of time.

    MHB, do you know what the other 4 successful top-level domains were in that article ?

    Assuming .Asia is one of them

  19. says

    One of the above comments erroneously mentioned the organization I founded, Connecting.nyc Inc., as an applicant for the .nyc TLD. This is incorrect. We are a NYS not-for-profit created to advocate for, and assist in the development of, the .nyc TLD as a public interest resource.

    Contrary to the typical more-is-better green eye shade view of TLDs, public interest city-TLDs are to be judged by the improvements they enable to city economic and social life. If .nyc only makes use of 1,000 domain names and substantially improves the quality of life, we say success.

    But with over 200,000 small businesses, there will be far more .nyc names sold. Add to this the names for civic and government use, neighborhoods, artists and innovators, the Internet of Things… and the number rises to the realm of the green.

    But the key to success is exclusivity and protecting the brand, so expect a tough nexus and don’t look for easy pickings. (Our big push these days is for a sustainable TLD, one that provides good names for our children and theirs.)

    We see global cities leading the way to a more intuitive DNS, with less dependence on search engines and .com a ghetto.

  20. says

    Mike, I don’t know what the previous comment is all about, but as proprietor of nycdomain org, I did not post it.

    As far as I know, NYC is not registered trademark for anything related to domain names or domain registration.

  21. says

    The heart of your writing whilst sounding agreeable in the beginning, did not work very well
    with me after some time. Someplace within the sentences you actually managed to make me a believer but just for a while.
    I nevertheless have a problem with your leaps in assumptions and you might do
    well to fill in those gaps. If you actually can accomplish that, I could surely be impressed.

  22. Accent says

    .cat = Catalan community, an ethnic group in Spain. How they managed to get their own extension six years ago has got to be a great story. .Cat is supposed to be strictly restricted to sites supporting the Catalan language or culture.

    I have sold two .LA domains for decent prices. One to a German, the other went to China. Without promotion there is no .LA for Los Angeles. A city might be compact enough to market a TLD, but the .LA registry has not felt it worth their while for all these years.

  23. bnalponstog says

    @pt So every person around the globe is going to remember that it is “.NYC” and not “.NewYork” or instead “.NewYorkCity” ??

    – Probably, aside from those who are now haplessly keying in “.Network” or “.Networking” instead of “.NET”

  24. says

    .nyc is, in my book, one of the very few geo acronyms
    that will do well in the new gTLD’s. Other abbreviations
    for large cities, e.g. .lon or .ldn (for London), aren’t very
    intuitive and won’t be so popular.

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