History Does Repeat Itself: Historia.com Hits The Auction Block At NameJet 1 Year After It Sold For Over $40K

The domain name Historia.com is back in pre-release at NameJet.com just about one year after it sold on NameJet.com for over $40K.

There is an old saying that history repeats itself, and that saying is proving to be correct.

Historia is Spanish for History.

It is also the name of a cable station in Canada

There is also a Historia Magazine published in France.

Although the domain backorder period for Historia.com doesn’t close for a week (Feb 7th) there are already 174 bidders.

Historia.com sold on NameJet.com on February 11th 2010, with a high bid of $40,300.

I reached out to the winner of last year’s auction,  MrsJello who told me he won the auction  “but felt there was a fraud bidder who bumped the price, reported to namejet, but they did not want to sell at the last price before the “fraudster” was envolved…”

Typically when the winner of an auction on Namejet.com or SnapNames.com fails to pay for the domain, the domain name is placed back into auction shortly thereafter in an auction only opened to those who originally back ordered the domain.

However in this case, not only has it taken a full year for the domain to return to auction, but the auction is now opened for all to join.

I reached out to Namejet.com for comment last week.

Now in complete fairness The GM of NameJet.com has changed in the year since the 1st auction took place and in a response I received via email several days ago, he said he had no knowledge about the situation, but would check into itt and get back to me.

Hopefully NameJet.com will leave a comment on this post letting us know what happened, but for now we have a lot more questions than answers.

Comments

  1. says

    Ouch! Hard to imagine a shill bidder at NameJet? Not that it hasn’t been seen before. Strange though that it took them so long to get around to putting the name back up again.

    Well no doubt with 174 bidders already standing in the wings this one will not be in my budget.

    Interesting to see at what level the the gavel gets banged this time around.

  2. says

    Would have been interesting to know why he thought it was a fraudulent bidder. Perhaps he changed his mind about buying the domain. Other than researching who the other bidder was, which is almost impossible, what could you go on? It probably took so long since they wanted to collect 40k. It’s not like someone beat them for $1,400.

  3. Still Chillin' After All These Domains says

    It sounds like they wanted the storm to blow over and resell it at a higher price than it would if it were just the original bidders.

    This seems pretty dirty of NameJet if you ask me.

  4. domo sapiens says

    It is spanish (in addtion to other languages) and it is the most significant language fact.

    I could swear seen the whois under the name of a promminent domainer.

    Weird.

  5. .com says

    There is a not of fraudulent bidding at Namejet. It is done under various names so it is harder to track. Also, since you have 7 days from the close of an auction to pay or not pay, a shill bidder cannot be identified for at least 7 days after the first instance of shill bidding. During those 7 days, the shill bidder can shill bid as much as he wants.

  6. .com says

    There is a lot of fraudulent bidding at Namejet. It is done under various names so it is harder to track. Also, since you have 7 days from the close of an auction to pay or not pay, a shill bidder cannot be identified for at least 7 days after the first instance of shill bidding. During those 7 days, the shill bidder can shill bid as much as he wants.

  7. Aggro says

    Shill bidder or not, Jello should have taken it for $40,000.

    IMO, for a quality name like this + a year later with the extra publicity, it will go for more than $40,300.

    As for 174 bidders…160 are the usual ‘rubber-neckers’ who have nothing better to do than watch

  8. .com says

    MHB

    Interesting. There is no particular reason to think the non-paying winners are shill bidders sponsored by Namejet as opposed to simply being deadbeat bidders. However, once Namejet has been notified, as you say you’ve done on multiple occasions, they have to take some responsibility. The longer/more often it happens, the more it looks like Namejet is implicitly condoning deadbeat/shill bidding.

  9. Anon-A-Bear says

    Page Howe nailed it.

    I have strongly come to suspect NJ is a fraud machine no different than Snapnames. What makes the nut hard to crack is that there’s no doubt that certain, relevant parties- registrars, auction houses and perhaps even registries- are all in bed with one another. This is precisely what happens when lots of money is involved in an industry that is unregulated.

    The evidence out there is VERY damming against these operations, but what you can you do? To whom do we appeal? ICANN? The entire drop game has become a systematic abuse process that was not meant to be this way. If ICANN hasn’t done anything about it by now, they never will…

    Chris Ambler speculated about it in his writeup with DNJournal- everyone knows the whole game is a scheme. What’s become so grotesque is how certain parties have conspired with one another to carve it all up.

    “Anyone who doesn’t know how dirty the domain name business is just doesn’t know the domain name business.” -Arrington

  10. says

    Because I was not the GM of NameJet at the time, I do not feel comfortable speculating on why the domain was not paid for. I can confirm however that all parties involved in the auction were in good standing as NameJet customers at the time. The reason why the domain was not re-auctioned was simply because it was not manually rescheduled for auction shortly after the close of the initial auction. It has now run it’s natural course and is currently scheduled as part of our Pre-Release.

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