NameJet.com Throws Its Hat Into The Ring For Landrush & Sunrise Auctions For New gTLD’s

According to a press release just out NameJet.com announced that offering Land Rush and Sunrise auction services for new gTLD registries to settle contested domain name applications.

“The unprecedented release of so many top level domains means that domain Registries will need a trusted, reliable partner to handle the various auction-related opportunities that the ICANN process will allow,” said Matt Overman, general manager of NameJet.

“As a joint venture between Web.com and Demand Media–who together own three of the top ten largest ICANN-accredited registrars–NameJet has both the foundational expertise and the customer reach necessary to ensure success in the auction arena.”

“In the Sunrise and Land Rush auction segment, NameJet will offer auction services for Registries that wish to auction the rights to their generic TLD strings in order to maximize revenue from domains that have multiple interested parties. NameJet also plans to offer both auction services and brokerage services for Registry-reserved premium domains.”

“With approximately 8,000 domain name auctions per month and a customer base of more than 100,000 bidders, NameJet can offer Registries robust email campaigns, online advertising, sponsorships and multiple partnership opportunities to an attentive and growing market. With a long history of providing secure, premium auction services, NameJet is a Registry’s best option when it comes to auction services in this new internet era.”

NameJet.com now joins Pool.com and Sedo.com as provider of Landrush & Sunrise domain name auctions for new gTLD’s Registries

Comments

  1. Archiba says

    Mr Berkins, at the end of your previous blog entry you reference a website I have never heard of: adage.com.

    The “com” doesn’t tell me much about what they do there. If it was adage.news, adage.blog, adage.tech wouldn’t I know more about what the Adage folks are doing?

    All of the sudden I’m feeling starved for information without something more specific right of the dot. The “com” does not tell me anything.

  2. Archiba says

    I call PARADIGM SHIFT on this whole domain thing as of the recent tld application announcements.

    Here is the shift: useful info on both sides of the dot will immediately become the expectation.

    The letters on the right side of the dot become fertile ground. Instead of generic extensions those letters will now get people to click on the links because they have specific info to guide them.

    Consider two links on a page:

    MikeBerkins.law – good idea what is on the website
    MikeBerkins.com – could be anything (if you don’t know the person already)

    I think seeing the new tld links on web pages will be a revelation. The old generic addresses are actually “blind” links in comparison.

  3. Archiba says

    People keep referencing past generic alt extension failures as predictors of the future. Let me posit that the problem is the generic quality itself. Consider:

    MikeBerkins.pro – weak domain because it doesn’t tell me what exactly it is that Mike does

    MikeBerkins.law – great domain because I know what Mike does

    PARADIGM SHIFT

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